• Biology 3014 - Biology and Ecology of Boreal and Arctic Seaweeds

    • Instructor: TBA
    • Dates: July 18-July 31, 2018
    • Credit: 3 credit hours
    • Description:

      The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the global significance of marine algae. Students will learn to collect and identify living species and to appreciate their evolution, productivity, biogeography. The crucial role they play in food webs through their interactions with animals and other organisms will be examined. Other topics include; algae and climatic change, algal aquaculture, commercial algae, algal environmental indicators, and edible seaweeds.

    • Field Trip:
      This course may include a field trip to Southern Labrador.  The cost associated with this field trip will be approximately $175.00 to $200.00.
    • References:
    • Evaluation:
      Quiz 15%, Paper 20%, Discussions & Presentations 10%, Participation 10%, Field notebook 10%, Final exam 35%
  • Biology 7926 - Field Sampling Approaches and Applied Statistical Philosophy

    • Instructor: Dr. Craig Purchase, MUN
    • Dates: Contact instructor for 2018 dates
    • Description:

      ​This class is designed to teach students how to conduct field research well. It combines physical methods of gathering data with statistical philosophy to identify benefits of different approaches for even slightly differing hypotheses. It is field intensive, hands-on, and applied. The major focus will be on practical techniques and tradeoffs between data quality, quantity, costs, and ethical/environmental considerations. You will gain experience in critical thinking and field techniques; the biology of the organisms sampled will not be evaluated.

      Topics
      Nuances of hypothesis testing, implications of precision & accuracy, pseudoreplication, statistical power, hierarchical database design, field note taking, survey design, and use of various biological sampling equipment/techniques (e.g., map/compass, GPS, boats, traps, nets,  electrofishing, tissue sampling, animal anesthetics and tagging, hydroacoustics, scientific photography).
    • Evaluation: Large relational database hierarchical design and construction 25%, Field participation/initiation 10%, Field notebook 10%, Data collection proposal on assigned topic 10%, Class presentation 10%, Final exam 35%
  • Biology 4710 - Experimental Marine Ecology of Newfoundland Waters

    • Instructor: Dr. Paul Snelgrove, MUN
    • Dates: Not offered for 2018
    • Credit: 3 credit hours
    • Description:

      ​This two-week field course examines the ecology of cold ocean environments, focussing on energy flux through marine pelagic and benthic flora and fauna of Newfoundland waters, and how the dynamics of this environment influence linkages among organisms in different habitats. The course will be field intensive with some lecture component and a strong hands-on field component. Students will identify local organisms and study how and why they vary in time and space. This course will be offered during two weeks of the Spring semester.

      PR: Science 1807; BIOL 2600
    • References:
    • Evaluation:
  • Biology 3712 - Benthic Biology

    • Dates: Not offered for 2018
    • Description:

      ​Examines the biology of the aquatic benthos (bottom-dwelling organisms); their origins, adaptations, life histories and ecological roles. This course may be offered in a usual 13 week semester or as a two-week field course. CR: the former Biology 3630  PR: Biology 2122, 2600 and 3710

    • References:
    • Evaluation:
  • Biology 4810 - Marine Research Field Course

    • Dates: May 9 - May 22, 2018
    • Credit: 3 credit hours
    • Description:
      The purpose of this course is to give students training and experience in independent field research. Each student will be totally responsible for every aspect of a personal research project. On campus, during the early winter, they will undertake a thorough literature review of the current primary literature, compile every detail of the design of the experiment(s) including statistical techniques, complete a list of necessary equipment and reagents, and generally be ready to start the project. Thirty per cent of the course mark depends upon successful completion of this preliminary phase. The actual research will be undertaken at the Bonne Bay Marine Station in Norris Point during the two-week period after examinations end. The project report will be submitted immediately following the completion of the work. The instructors will help and advise but the student must be independent. Although this requires hard work in often-uncomfortable conditions, most students find this course extremely rewarding and memorable.
    • Field Trip:
    • References:
    • Evaluation:
      Project Proposal & Preparation 25%, Final Report 50%, Seminars & Participation 25%
  • Biology 4912 – Biology of Marine Mammals

    • Dates: July 4 - July 17, 2018
    • Credit: 3 credit hours
    • Textbook: TBD
    • Description:
      The waters adjacent to Newfoundland Labrador are excellent locations for observing and studying marine mammals. This course offers students a unique opportunity to study and observe several species of whales, seals, dolphins and porpoise within a two-week period. There will be frequent field trips at sea to observe marine mammals in their natural habitats. Lectures and lab sessions will cover the adaptations, behaviour, morphology, sensory systems, evolution, community ecology and conservation issues of marine mammals as well as future prospects.
    • Field Trip:
      This course will involve a field trip to Port au Choix, St. Anthony and L'Anse aux Meadows. The cost associated with this field trip will be $150.00.
    • References:
    • Evaluation:
      Evaluation-diversity project 5%, research paper 20%, presentation of research 20%, laboratory session notes 10%, course participation 10%, final exam 35%.
  • Biology 3714 - Estuarine Fish Ecology

    • Instructor: Dr. Craig Purchase, MUN
    • Dates: June 20 - July 3, 2018
    • Credit: 3 credit hours
    • Description:
      Community structure, function and distribution of northern coastal fishes in fjords and estuarine environments. Emphasis on sampling, field techniques, taxonomy, quantitative characterization, adaptations and habitat relationships. A comparative approach will contrast fish communities from other areas.
    • Evaluation: Presentation 10%, Mid-course exam 15%, Field notebook 10%, Participation/Initiation 15%, Individual research components 25%, Final Exam 25%
  • Biology 3709 - Marine Principles and Techniques

    • Instructor: Dr. Evan Edinger
    • Dates: May 30 - June 12, 2018
    • Credit: 3 credit hours
    • Description:
      This is an introduction to marine habitats, organisms and sampling techniques. Students will become familiar with the important invertebrates and plants that characterize Newfoundland's coastal waters. The structure of various biological communities and the interactions between the key organisms and their oceanographic and geological habitats are stressed. The course is structured as a sequence of daily field and laboratory modules including: hydrography, water masses, water chemistry, phytoplankton, zooplankton, saltmarshes, tidal flats, rocky shores, sedimentary communities, marine birds and mammals, marine pollution, fisheries management, etc. Students will learn to use oceanographic and biological sampling equipment and methods used to scientifically examine each of these habitats and groups of organisms.
    • Field Trip:

       

    • References: Peterson Field Guide to the Atlantic Seashore Stevens et al., Gros Morne National Park map
    • Evaluation: Assignments 45%, Notebook 15%, Final Exam 30%

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